Although 2018 has seen a rise in plant based eating, it looks like 2019 will be the year when consumers really take their meat eating seriously.

An increase in consumer conciousness has led to a demand from customers to know where their meat is coming from, if it is ethical and how far it has had to travel to get onto their plate with more consumers wanting to eat meat that has been grass fed, and British cured meats.

As consumers become more conscious of waste and sustainability, both meat and seafood have seen a rise in the nose to tail eating a demand for sustainable varieties. The IFE 2019 attendees will be looking to source and discover the very latest on the market to help them deliver high-quality and sustainable products to their consumers, with a particular focus on: 

Grass fed meat

Throughout 2018 we have seen how important the quality of meat is to consumers and this looks to continue into 2019, with the focus being on grass fed red meat. 

Grass fed meat is emerging as one of the super foods, and as a healthier alternative to grain fed meat. The difference is that grass fed meat products are much lower in fat content as compared to the grain fed meat products. Grass fed meat has higher nutrient content of linoleic acid (CLA), antioxidants and vitamins meaning it is one of the best lean meat options available currently in the market.

There's definitely a gap in the market for meat processors and farmers to offer new grass-fed product variants to consumers.

British cured meat

“Like many people, I thought you couldn't make charcuterie in this country. The demand has just outstripped supply,” - Sean Cannon, Cannon & Cannon

Lidl has linked up with London charcuterie business Canon and Canon as the demand for British cured meats grows in popularity.

Provenance

34% of GB consumers say they are motivated to spend by the “Made in GB” message - Foresight Factory

Provenance is becoming more & more important to the consumer, especially within the meat & seafood sector. Consumers look to brands with local credentials in support of their community, to feel better connected with heritage and in a quest for sustainability.

Promoting brand heritage with pride gives consumers something relatable to invest in – both financially and emotionally. The appeal of sustainability also contributes to Local Allure. Eco-ethical concerns motivate many to consider food miles and investigate supply chains, so transparency from brands on this front will appeal.

More sustainable fish

‘Britons spend £2.8bn a year on fish, but £1.2bn of that goes only on cod, salmon and tuna which account for 42 per cent of the fish eaten in the UK. Supplies of some of these fish are problematic.' - The Independent

The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) has updated its Good Fish Guide and drawn up a post-Brexit top ten detailing which are the best fish to eat in terms of sustainability, with some new “best choice” additions that could be the fish suppers of the future.

The top 10 includes dab, seine, certified hake, and certified herring. Also on the list are some types of sustainably caught mackerel, megrim, UK rope-grown mussels, Devon brown crab, traditionally caught queen scallops, pollack and Dover sole.

Popularity of offal

“I think we will see restaurant prices increase as food inflation continues, and this will give rise to some of the unsung heroes of gastronomy, like offal, using more or every part of the animals we raise for food. This will encourage chefs to get more creative with the ‘bits and bobs’ and hopefully encourage customers to eat more of them.” - Ross Shonhan, founder of Bone Daddies, Shackfuyu and Flesh & Buns in London

Nose to tail is not a new way of eating, but rather a return to a more traditional way of eating that respects the animal rather than makes it a commodity in a factory-style system of production and consumption.

Interested in taking part in IFE 2019?  Contact our team today to find out more on how you can get involved in the show and put your products in front of this buying audience.